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 Daily Port Update

Subject:CHARLESTON SC DAILY PORT UPDATE
Date:Monday, February 07, 2011
Priority:Normal
Notice:

PORT LIMITS/INFORMATION
------------------------
Maximum Depths - (Fresh)
Harbor Entrance - 47.0 ft
Main Channel - 45.0 ft

BERTH LIMITS/INFORMATION:
-------------------------
Current maximum drafts allowed at berths:

Amerada Hess - Max draft - 40'00
Delfin - Max Draft - 42'00
Chem Marine - Max Draft - 38'00 MLW
Kinder Morgan - berth 1 - 40'00
Kinder Morgan - berth 2 - 40'00
Kinder Morgan - berth 3 - 30'00"
Kinder Morgan - berth 4 - Max draft 40'00, tide needed for anything
deeper than 38'00
BP - Max draft 32'6" Low water / Salt
Wando Terminal - Max draft 45'00 MLW - Max BM No restriction North
Charleston Terminal - Max draft 45'00 MLW - Max BM No restriction
CST - Max draft 45'00 MLW - Max BM No restrictions
Nucor - Max draft 25'00 (movements daylight & tidal restricted), Max LOA
450', Max Beam 52'

Per pilots - restrictions for Tanker movements:
Drafts of 38'00 or less may transit at anytime Drafts of 38'01 to 40'00 -
window: Start in 1 Hour before low water until 2 hours before high water
Drafts of 40'01 to 41'00 - window: start in 2 hours after low water until
2 hours before high water
Drafts of 41'01 to 42'00 - window: start in 3 hours after low water until
3 hours before high water

=============================================

VESSEL TRAFFIC:
KMI4 - BOW FLOWER - IN ETD 1200/7TH
HESS - ELKA GLORY - IN ETD 2330/7TH
BP - T/B INTEGRITY/650-4 - ETA 1930/7TH
KMI4 - SPORADES - ETA 0030/8TH

============================================
FEDERAL, STATE & LOCAL FILING REQUIREMENTS:
---------------------------------------------

96 Hours - advance notice of arrival required by USCG

48 Hours - advance receipt of crew list by Immigration for any vessel
arriving from a foreign port, or arriving coast wise with detained crew.

24 Hours (minimum) - Foreign cargo must have manifest submitted to
Customs & Border Patrol AMS. Bond must be filed for Foreign flag vessels
or U.S. flag arriving with foreign cargo aboard. 24 Hours - advance
notice to Pilots

24 Hours - advance fax of crew list and approved visitors required by
Terminal.

72 Hours - post port call, the Port Authority requires bill of lading
figures for all bulk cargo.

Port Security - All persons doing business within Port Authority property
must have security pass from SCPA. All persons wanting unescorted access
to any vessel must have a valid TWIC.

=======================================================

Current Articles:

US ports race to keep up with bigger Panama Canal



SAVANNAH, Ga. — When Savannah welcomed the largest cargo ship ever to call
on its booming seaport, the visiting vessel barely fit. The Figaro had to
sail in loaded at half capacity to avoid scraping the river bottom, and
even then could only navigate the shallow channel at high tide.

East Coast ports from New York to Miami simply aren’t deep enough to handle
such mammoth vessels as the CMA CGM Figaro, which measures 1,100 feet long
with space for 8,500 cargo containers a tractor-trailer can haul one at a
time. With a major expansion of the Panama Canal projected to be finished
by the end of 2014, these gargantuan vessels will be able to sail between
Asia and the U.S. East Coast.

The canal expansion is pitting seaports up and down the Atlantic coast in a
race to dig deeper harbors capable of handling the so-called post-Panamax
ships.


“It’s going to almost triple the size of the vessels that are going to be
able to transit the canal,” said Kurt J. Nagle, president of the American
Association of Port Authorities. “I don’t think it’s overhyped to say it’s
a gamechanger.”

The post-Panamax ships require depths of up to 50 feet of water to navigate
when fully loaded. Only one East Coast seaport — Norfolk, Va. — is that
deep. Other ports are scrambling for federal permits and hundreds of
millions of taxpayer dollars to scrape and suck tons of sand and mud from
their bays and river bottoms.

The port of New York/New Jersey, the busiest port on the eastern seaboard,
already has a $2.3 billion project under way to deepen its harbor to 50
feet. But the Bayonne Bridge spanning the shipping channel is too low for
the biggest ships, and port officials say at least $1.3 billion more is
needed to raise the span.

Savannah, the nation’s fourth busiest container port and No. 2 on the East
Coast, wants $588 million to dredge 6 feet from the Savannah River along 35
miles between the ocean and the city’s port. The federal government would
pay about two-thirds of the bill, but first the Army Corps of Engineers
needs approval to start the project, which is expected within the year.

“This is a project that has significance not just for this area of the
state or the state itself, but for the entire Southeast,” Georgia Gov.
Nathan Deal said during a Jan. 28 visit to the Savannah port.

Dock workers at the Savannah port, 240 miles from Georgia’s state Capitol,
are doing their part to help push for deeper water. When the Army Corps
held a recent workshop here to gather public comment on the project, the
local chapter of the International Longshoremen’s Association had 600 port
workers show up to voice their support.

Christopher Johnson, a second-generation longshoreman and one of the
union’s 1,700 Savannah workers, said larger ships carrying more cargo
should translate to more workers needed to unload them. But Savannah could
lose jobs, he says, if it doesn’t dredge and its competitors do in nearby
Charleston, S.C., and Jacksonville, Fla.
Previous coverage

Newsome says Panama Canal expansion will increase size of local shipping
industry, published 10/19/2010

“If we don’t get the project done, we’re afraid the ships may go to other
areas,” said Johnson, 46. “Our workload depends on the ships coming up the
river. If the ships don’t come, we don’t eat.”

Meanwhile, South Carolina officials are seeking $400,000 in federal money
for a feasibility study by the Army Corps to determine if it can deepen the
Charleston port from 45 to 50 feet. Charleston is the East Coast’s fourth
busiest container port, and No. 12 nationally.

Miami’s port already has permission to dredge and is asking for $75 million
to start the project’s first phase. Studies are under way to deepen two
other Florida ports in Ft. Lauderdale and Jacksonville.

“Certainly every port is counting on it having a big impact,” said Bernard
Groseclose, former chief executive of South Carolina’s seaports who now
works as a private consultant. “Everyone is telling the same story: We’re
getting ready for the Panama Canal expansion.”

But getting funding may have just gotten tougher.

Federal dollars used for dredging projects and the studies required to
approve them typically get added to congressional budget bills as
“earmarks” — line items requested by individual lawmakers to benefit their
districts back home. Yet earmark spending was widely denounced as
government waste in the 2010 elections that swept Republicans back in
control of the U.S. House.

As a result, GOP lawmakers in both the House and Senate have sworn off
earmarks for the time being. It’s not clear how else port projects would
obtain federal money.

“It has the potential to have a dramatic impact,” said Nagle, who insists
port projects aren’t waste. “There clearly is a distinction between these
types of projects and what is typically the target of the ban.”

Both Nagle and Groseclose agree not all ports seeking to supersize their
harbors will get approved — and both don’t think every U.S. port needs to
be deep enough for the largest ships.

But some are questioning how the federal government decides which projects
move forward.

In studies finished last November that recommend deepening Savannah’s
harbor, the Army Corps of Engineers concludes the project would have
economic benefits for the nation as a whole — the benchmark for the
agency’s approval.

But what the Army Corps hasn’t done is take a comprehensive look at all
East Coast ports to determine how many should be dredged to post-Panamax
depths and which would reap the most benefits for the best price.

“The Corps is evaluating the cost and benefits of these individual
proposals in a vacuum,” said Chris DeScherer, an attorney for the Southern
Environmental Law Center. “Where does it make the most sense on the East
Coast to have a deep water port? Where does the American taxpayer get the
most bang for his buck with the least environmental impact?”

The Army Corps said it hasn’t done a broader study to compare ports, in
part, because no one has asked.

The Corps doesn’t have the authority to initiate port studies on its own.

“To date, there has been no request by the ports or Congress to undertake a
comprehensive study,” said Jim Walker, chief of the Navigation Program for
the Army Corps of Engineers.

=======================================================

Orbitz says Charleston cruise prices falling, but Carnival officials are
suggesting otherwise


A record number of cruise ships -- with 90 scheduled already -- will sail
into and out of the Port of Charleston this year, possibly at drastically
lower rates.

Charleston's cruises booked so far cost 41 percent less than the previous
year's sailings, according to information from the online travel service
Orbitz. The company found that the average cruise passenger has paid $1,220
for a fun ship vacation this year, compared with $2,062 in 2010.

The cruise news coincides with the exact opposite change in local airfares.
Charleston International Airport marked the nation's highest average price
increase with a 27 percent jump between the third quarters of 2009 and last
year, according to the U.S. Transportation Department.

The average cost of a flight rose to about $450 during that time, federal
figures show, though Southwest Airlines' arrival next month is expected to
push that figure down.

Charleston's cruise calendar includes home port turnaround calls to the
Bahamas on the Carnival Fantasy at least once a week. Carnival in May
launches a sailing to Bermuda, the company's first ever voyages between
Charleston and the British overseas territory.

Contrary to the Orbitz index, Carnival Cruise Lines forecasts a price
increase in 2011. In a 2010 year-end earnings report, the company predicted
a 3 percent to 4 percent rise in revenues this year.

Carnival officials declined to comment directly on the Orbitz report.

Orbitz representatives say the company's "Cruise Index" is based on
confirmed bookings made through Jan. 13 for any 2011 sailing. Cruises
account for four of every 10 bookings that Kathy Torino handles at North
Charleston-based Travel Leaders. She said the Orbitz figure likely will
change as the year goes on.

The prices now take into account the least expensive bunk cabins, early
purchase discounts, plus cut-rate fall deals -- after students return to
school and families become less likely to vacation.

"Are they 40 percent off? Yes," Torino said. "It's a legitimate rate, but
it's got a lot of restrictions."

Torino said travelers seem to be booking earlier this year. One repeat
customer came into her office Thursday looking to repeat a spring break
vacation with two side-by-side cruise cabins in April.

"We couldn't find two cabins next to each other, let alone at a desirable
rate," Torino said.

Charleston not only showed the greatest year over year price drop,
according to Orbitz, but left a wide gap between the second-place ports.
Galveston, Texas, and Baltimore tied at a 27 percent decrease.

Florida remained the most popular state for sailings, with Miami, Port
Canaveral and Fort Lauderdale taking the top three spots, respectively.
Those ports also showed little to no change in prices between 2010 and
2011, according to Orbitz.

The company predicts that cruising to the Caribbean will reach all-time
highs in the next six months.

=======================================================

CURRENT ISSUES:
02/08/11 - 1145 - CWIT Luncheon
02/08/11 - 1700 - COMMISSIONERS OF PILOTAGE
02/11/11 - MARITIME ASSOC. ANNUAL MEETING & GALA

FUTURE/ONGOING ISSUES:
02/24/2011 - CHARLESTON PROP CLUB OYSTER ROAST
2014 - ETA FOR NEW CHARLESTON PORT TERMINAL TO BE COMPLETED

===============================================

SECURITY LEVEL: MARSEC 1 -
HURRICANE STATUS - 5 - OUT OF SEASON

===================================================================

Tides for Charleston (Customhouse Wharf) starting with February 4, 2011.
Day High Tide Height Sunrise Moon Time % Moon
/Low Time Feet Sunset Visible

M 7 Low 4:15 AM 0.3 7:10 AM Rise 9:10 AM 12
7 High 10:24 AM 4.8 5:58 PM Set 10:18 PM
7 Low 4:31 PM 0.1
7 High 10:36 PM 4.9

Tu 8 Low 4:53 AM 0.5 7:09 AM Rise 9:40 AM 19
8 High 10:59 AM 4.6 5:59 PM Set 11:13 PM
8 Low 5:06 PM 0.2
8 High 11:15 PM 4.9

W 9 Low 5:35 AM 0.7 7:08 AM Rise 10:12 AM 27
9 High 11:37 AM 4.3 5:59 PM
9 Low 5:47 PM 0.3
9 High 11:59 PM 4.8

Th 10 Low 6:24 AM 0.9 7:08 AM Set 12:09 AM 36
10 High 12:22 PM 4.2 6:00 PM Rise 10:48 AM
10 Low 6:34 PM 0.4

F 11 High 12:50 AM 4.8 7:07 AM Set 1:07 AM 45
11 Low 7:21 AM 1.0 6:01 PM Rise 11:29 AM
11 High 1:16 PM 4.1
11 Low 7:29 PM 0.4

Sa 12 High 1:50 AM 4.9 7:06 AM Set 2:05 AM 55
12 Low 8:25 AM 0.9 6:02 PM Rise 12:17 PM
12 High 2:19 PM 4.1
12 Low 8:31 PM 0.3

Su 13 High 2:56 AM 5.0 7:05 AM Set 3:02 AM 65
13 Low 9:31 AM 0.8 6:03 PM Rise 1:12 PM
13 High 3:24 PM 4.2
13 Low 9:36 PM 0.1

M 14 High 4:00 AM 5.3 7:04 AM Set 3:56 AM 75
14 Low 10:32 AM 0.5 6:04 PM Rise 2:14 PM
14 High 4:27 PM 4.5
14 Low 10:38 PM -0.3

Tu 15 High 5:00 AM 5.6 7:03 AM Set 4:46 AM 84
15 Low 11:28 AM 0.1 6:05 PM Rise 3:21 PM
15 High 5:25 PM 4.9
15 Low 11:36 PM -0.7

W 16 High 5:56 AM 5.9 7:02 AM Set 5:32 AM 91
16 Low 12:19 PM -0.3 6:06 PM Rise 4:30 PM
16 High 6:20 PM 5.3

Th 17 Low 12:31 AM -1.0 7:01 AM Set 6:13 AM 96
17 High 6:47 AM 6.2 6:07 PM Rise 5:41 PM
17 Low 1:07 PM -0.7
17 High 7:12 PM 5.7

F 18 Low 1:24 AM -1.2 7:00 AM Set 6:52 AM 99
18 High 7:37 AM 6.3 6:07 PM Rise 6:52 PM
18 Low 1:55 PM -1.0
18 High 8:03 PM 6.0

Sa 19 Low 2:16 AM -1.3 6:59 AM Set 7:29 AM 99
19 High 8:25 AM 6.3 6:08 PM Rise 8:03 PM
19 Low 2:41 PM -1.1
19 High 8:54 PM 6.2

Su 20 Low 3:07 AM -1.3 6:58 AM Set 8:05 AM 96
20 High 9:13 AM 6.1 6:09 PM Rise 9:13 PM
20 Low 3:28 PM -1.1
20 High 9:45 PM 6.2

=========================================================================

OFFSHORE WATERS FORECAST

Synopsis...HIGH PRES WILL WEAKEN OVER THE AREA TODAY WHILE AN AREA OF LOW
PRES TRACKS NE OFF THE COAST. A COLD FRONT WILL THEN PUSH THROUGH TONIGHT
FOLLOWED BY HIGH PRES TUE INTO WED. ANOTHER STORM SYSTEM WILL MOVE NE UP
THE COAST WED NIGHT INTO THU WITH HIGH PRES AGAIN ON FRI.
Today...Variable winds 5 to 10 kt...becoming NW late. Seas 1 to 2 ft. A
chance of rain early this morning...then showers late this morning and
afternoon.

Tonight...NW winds 5 to 10 kt...becoming W 15 to 20 kt with gusts to 25 kt
after midnight. Seas 1 to 2 ft...building to 2 to 4 ft after midnight.
Showers in the evening...then a chance of rain after midnight.

Tue...W winds 15 to 20 kt with gusts to 25 kt... Becoming NW 10 to 15 kt in
the afternoon. Seas 2 to 3 ft.

Tue Night...N winds 10 to 15 kt. Seas 2 to 3 ft.

Wed...NE winds 10 to 15 kt. Seas 3 to 4 ft. A slight chance of showers in
the morning...then a chance of showers in the afternoon.

Wed Night...NE winds 10 to 15 kt. Seas 2 to 3 ft. A chance of rain in the
evening...then rain likely after midnight.

Thu...N winds 15 to 20 kt...diminishing to 10 to 15 kt. Seas 3 to 4
ft...subsiding to 2 to 3 ft. A chance of rain.

Fri...NW winds 10 to 15 kt. Seas 2 to 3 ft.
Notice posted on Monday, February 07, 2011

Disclaimer
For quality assurance purposes please note well that while the above information is regularly vetted for accuracy it is not intended to replace the local knowledge or expertise pertaining to port conditions of our marine operations personnel. Port précis should always be verified by contacting the corresponding marine department of a particular location for the most up-to-date information.